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Leopardi and Schopenhauer : an English translation of "Leonardi e Schopenhauer" by Francesco De Sanctis (1858): an English translation of "Leonardi e Schopenhauer" by Francesco De Sanctis (1858)

By De Sanctis, Francesco

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Book Id: WPLBN0100301808
Format Type: PDF (eBook)
File Size: 380.13 KB.
Reproduction Date: 02/15/2019

Title: Leopardi and Schopenhauer : an English translation of "Leonardi e Schopenhauer" by Francesco De Sanctis (1858): an English translation of "Leonardi e Schopenhauer" by Francesco De Sanctis (1858)  
Author: De Sanctis, Francesco
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Non Fiction, Philosophy, Arthur Schopenhauer (German philosopher, 1788-1860) & Giacomo Leopardi(Italian poet, 1798-1837)
Collections: Authors Community, Italy
Historic
Publication Date:
2019
Publisher: Rivista contemporanea
Member Page: Thomas Simpson

Citation

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Sanctis, F. D., & Simpson, T. H. (2019). Leopardi and Schopenhauer : an English translation of Leonardi e Schopenhauer by Francesco De Sanctis (1858). Retrieved from http://cn.ebooklibrary.org/


Description
possibly the first English translation of this interesting work by great literary critic Francesco De Sanctis, one of the fathers of the Italian national independence movement, later the young nation's Minister of Public Instruction, and author of a crucial history of Italian literature.

Summary
an English translation of a philosophical dialogue by Francesco De Sanctis, published in Italian in 1858, between "D" and "A" as they ride a train from Italy to Zurich, concerning the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer and its similarities to the poetic thought of Giacomo Leopardi.

Excerpt
"...Hegel is the greatest sinner, because the public’s head can't make room for intellectual intuition. With his dialectical process, Hegel gave an appearance of harmony to this philosophical monstrosity. He was its designer and architect, making the original sin durable. So Schopenhauer tore him to pieces. Charlatan, insipid, stupid, nauseating, an ignoramus whose shamelessness was touted as wisdom by cowardly followers; the true author of our century’s intellectual corruption. Schopenhauer can’t contain his indignation: “O, you admirers of this philosophy . . . ?” How can I say it? The Italian language is too demure; I can’t translate the emphatic epithet Arthur pins on this philosophy,. . . "

Table of Contents
the text, in dialogue form, has no chapter divisions

 
 



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