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Tcp Over Second (2.5G) and Third (3G) Generation Wireless Networks

By Inamura, H.

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Book Id: WPLBN0000694305
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 63.17 KB.
Reproduction Date: 2005
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Title: Tcp Over Second (2.5G) and Third (3G) Generation Wireless Networks  
Author: Inamura, H.
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Technology, Biology, Language
Collections: Technical eBooks Collection
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Inamura, H. (n.d.). Tcp Over Second (2.5G) and Third (3G) Generation Wireless Networks. Retrieved from http://cn.ebooklibrary.org/


Description
Technical Reference Publication

Excerpt
Introduction: The second generation cellular systems are commonly referred to as 2G. The 2G phase began in the 1990s when digital voice encoding had replaced analog systems (1G). 2G systems are based on various radio technologies including frequency-, code- and time- division multiple access. Examples of 2G systems include GSM (Europe), PDC (Japan), and IS-95 (USA). Data links provided by 2G systems are mostly circuit-switched and have transmission speeds of 10-20 kbps uplink and downlink. Demand for higher data rates, instant availability and data volume-based charging, as well as lack of radio spectrum allocated for 2G led to the introduction of 2.5G (for example, GPRS and PDC-P) and 3G (for example, Wideband CDMA and cdma2000) systems. Radio technology for both Wideband CDMA (W-CDMA) (adopted, for example, in Europe, Japan, etc) and cdma2000 (adopted, for example, in US, South Korea, etc) is based on code division multiple access allowing for higher data rates and more efficient spectrum utilization than 2G systems. 3G systems provide both packet-switched and circuit-switched connectivity in order to address the quality of service requirements of conversational, interactive, streaming, and bulk transfer applications. The transition to 3G is expected to be a gradual process. Initially, 3G will be deployed to introduce high capacity and high speed access in densely populated areas. Mobile users with multimode terminals will be able to utilize existing coverage of 2.5G systems on the rest of territory.

Table of Contents
Table of Contents 1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. 2.5G and 3G Link Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Latency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Data Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 Asymmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.4 Delay Spikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.5 Packet Loss Due to Corruption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.6 Intersystem Handovers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.7 Bandwidth Oscillation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3. Example 2.5G and 3G Deployments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.1 2.5G Technologies: GPRS, HSCSD and CDMA2000 1XRTT. . . . 8 3.2 A 3G Technology: W-CDMA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3 A 3G Technology: CDMA2000 1X-EV. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4. TCP over 2.5G and 3G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.1 Appropriate Window Size (Sender & Receiver). . . . . . . 11 4.2 Increased Initial Window (Sender). . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4.3 Limited Transmit (Sender). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4.4 IP MTU Larger than Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4.5 Path MTU Discovery (Sender & Intermediate Routers) . . . 13 4.6 Selective Acknowledgments (Sender & Receiver). . . . . . 13 4.7 Explicit Congestion Notification (Sender, Receiver & Intermediate Routers). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.8 TCP Timestamps Option (Sender & Receiver). . . . . . . . 13 4.9 Disabling RFC 1144 TCP/IP Header Compression (Wireless Host) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4.10 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5. Open Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 9. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 11. Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 12. Full Copyright Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

 
 



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