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The Invisible Girl

By Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft

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Book Id: WPLBN0000630427
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 24.00 KB
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: The Invisible Girl  
Author: Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Writing.
Collections: Blackmask Online Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Blackmask Online

Citation

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Shelley, M. W. (n.d.). The Invisible Girl. Retrieved from http://cn.ebooklibrary.org/


Description
Excerpt: This slender narrative has no pretensions to the regularity of a story, or the development of situations and feelings; it is but a slight sketch, delivered nearly as it was narrated to me by one of the humblest of the actors concerned: nor will I spin out a circumstance interesting principally from its singularity and truth, but narrate, as concisely as I can, how I was surprised on visiting what seemed a ruined tower, crowning a bleak promontory overhanging the sea, that flows between Wales and Ireland, to find that though the exterior preserved all the savage rudeness that betokened many a war with the elements, the interior was fitted up somewhat in the guise of a summer?house, for it was too small to deserve any other name. It consisted but of the ground?floor, which served as an entrance, and one room above, which was reached by a staircase made out of the thickness of the wall. This chamber was floored and carpeted, decorated with elegant furniture; and, above all, to attract the attention and excite curiosity, there hung over the chimney?piece for to preserve the apartment from damp a fire?place had been built evidently since it had assumed a guise so dissimilar to the object of its construction a picture simply painted in water?colours, which seemed more than any part of the adornments of the room to be at war with the rudeness of the building, the solitude in which it was placed, and the desolation of the surrounding scenery. This drawing represented a lovely girl in the very pride and bloom of youth; her dress was simple, in the fashion of the day (remember, reader, I write at the beginning of the eighteenth century), her countenance was embellished by a look of mingled innocence and intelligence, to which was added the imprint of serenity of soul and natural cheerfulness. She was reading one of those folio romances which have so long been the delight of the enthusiastic and young; her mandoline was at her feet her parroquet perched on a huge mirror near her; the arrangement of furniture and hangings gave token of a luxurious dwelling, and her attire also evidently that of home and privacy, yet bore with it an appearance of ease and girlish ornament, as if she wished to please. Beneath this picture was inscribed in golden letters, ?The Invisible Girl.?

Table of Contents
Table of Contents: The Invisible Girl, 1 -- Mary Shelley, 1

 
 



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