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Physical Activity and the Health of Young People

By Department of Health and Human Services

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Book Id: WPLBN0000170487
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.3 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Physical Activity and the Health of Young People  
Author: Department of Health and Human Services
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Medical research, Medical reports
Collections: Medical Library Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Health And Human Services, D. O. (n.d.). Physical Activity and the Health of Young People. Retrieved from http://cn.ebooklibrary.org/


Excerpt
Physical Activity and the Health of Young People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Division of Ad o les cent and School Health U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SER VIC ES CENTERS FOR DISEASE CON TROL AND PREVENTION March 2005 Benefits of Regular Physical Activity -- Helps build and maintain healthy bones and muscles1 -- Helps reduce the risk of developing obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Reduces feelings of depression and anxiety and promotes psychological well-being1 Long-Term Consequences of Physical Inactivity -- Overweight and obesity, influenced by poor diet and inactivity, are significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, asthma, arthritis, and poor health status.2 -- Physical inactivity increases the risk of dying prematurely, dying of heart disease, and developing diabetes, colon cancer, and high blood pressure. Overweight Among Youth -- The prevalence of overweight among children aged 6-11 has more than doubled in the past 20 years, increasing from 7% in 1980 to 16% in 2002.3,4 -- Children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults; 5,6,7 overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease.8 Participation in Physical Activity by Young People -- During the 7 days preceding the survey, 77% of children aged 9-13 reported participating in free-time physical activity, and 39% reported participating in organized physical activity.9 -- Sixty-three percent of high school students participate in sufficient vigorous physical activitya, and 25% participate in sufficient moderate physical activity.b,10 -- Participation in physical activity declines as children get older. -- Sixty-seven percent of high school students met the national recommendations for both vigorous and moderate physical activity in 2003.10 www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/PhysicalActivity Percentage of High School Students Participating in Different Types of Physical Activity, by Sex, 200310 a Physical activities that caused sweating and hard breathing, that were performed for 20 minutes or more on at least 3 of the 7 days preceding the survey. b Physical activities that did not cause sweating or hard breathing, that were performed for 30 minutes or more on at least 5 of the 7 days preceding the survey. c For example, push-ups, sit-ups, or weightlifting on at least 3 of the 7 days preceding the survey to strengthen or tone their muscles. d Run by their school or community groups during the 12 months preceding the survey. Type of Activity Girls Boys Sufficient vigorous physical activitya 55% 70% Sufficient moderate physical activityb 22% 27% Sufficient strengthening exercisesc 43% 60% Played on a sports teamd 51% 64% For Additional Information Contact: CDC, Division of Adolescent and School Health 4770 Buford Highway, NE Mail Stop K-12 Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717 888-231-6405 E-mail: HealthyYouth@cdc.gov www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/PhysicalActivity References 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical activity and health: A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996. 2. Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, Dietz WH, Vinicor F, Bales VS, Marks JS. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. Journal of the American Medical Association 2003;289(1): 76-79. 3. Ogden CL, Flegal KM, Carroll MD, Johnson CL. Prevalence and trends in overweight among U.S. children and adolescents, 1999-2000. Journal of the American Medical Association 2002;288: 1728–1732. 4. Hedley AA, Ogden CL, Johnson CL, Carroll MD, Curtin LR, Flegal KM. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children, adolescents, and adults, 1999-2002. Journal of the American Medical Asso

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