World Library  

QR link for Insectivorous Plants
Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

Insectivorous Plants

By Darwin, Charles

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0000013678
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 2.0 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Insectivorous Plants  
Author: Darwin, Charles
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Writing.
Collections: Classic Literature Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Ebook Library

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Darwin, C. (n.d.). Insectivorous Plants. Retrieved from http://cn.ebooklibrary.org/


Excerpt
gathered by chance a dozen plants, bearing fifty-six fully expanded leaves, and on thirty-one of these dead insects or remnants of them adhered; and, no doubt, many more would have been caught afterwards by these same leaves, and still more by those as yet not expanded. On one plant all six leaves had caught their prey; and on several plants very many leaves had caught more than a single insect. On one large leaf I found the remains of thirteen distinct insects. Flies (Diptera) are captured much oftener than other insects. The largest kind which I have seen caught was a small butterfly (Caenonympha pamphilus); but the Rev. H.M. Wilkinson informs me that he found a large living dragon-fly with its body firmly held by two leaves. As this plant is extremely common in some districts, the number of insects thus annually slaughtered must be prodigious. Many plants cause the death of insects, for instance the sticky buds of the horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), without thereby receiving, as far as we can perceive, any advantage; but it was soon evident that Drosera was excellently adapted for the special purpose of catching insects, so that the subject seemed well worthy of investigation.

Table of Contents
· CHAPTER I. DROSERA ROTUNDIFOLIA, OR THE COMMON SUN-DEW. · CHAPTER II. THE MOVEMENTS OF THE TENTACLES FROM THE CONTACT OF SOLID BODIES. · CHAPTER III. AGGREGATION OF THE PROTOPLASM WITHIN THE CELLS OF THE TENTACLES. · CHAPTER IV. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT ON THE LEAVES. · CHAPTER V. THE EFFECTS OF NON-NITROGENOUS AND NITROGENOUS ORGANIC FLUIDS ON THE LEAVES. · CHAPTER VI. THE DIGESTIVE POWER OF THE SECRETION OF DROSERA. · CHAPTER VII. THE EFFECTS OF SALTS OF AMMONIA. · CHAPTER VIII. THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS OTHER SALTS AND ACIDS ON THE LEAVES. · CHAPTER IX. THE EFFECTS OF CERTAIN ALKALOID POISONS, OTHER SUBSTANCES AND VAPOURS. · CHAPTER X. ON THE SENSITIVENESS OF THE LEAVES, AND ON THE LINES OF TRANSMISSION OF THE MOTOR IMPULSE. · CHAPTER XI. RECAPITULATION OF THE CHIEF OBSERVATIONS ON DROSERA ROTUNDIFOLIA. · CHAPTER XII. ON THE STRUCTURE AND MOVEMENTS OF SOME OTHER SPECIES OF DROSERA. · CHAPTER XIII. DIONAEA MUSCIPULA. · CHAPTER XIV. ALDROVANDA VESICULOSA. · CHAPTER XV. DROSOPHYLLUM—RORIDULA—BYBLIS—GLANDULAR HAIRS OF OTHER PLANTS— CONCLUDING REMARKS ON THE DROSERACEAE. · CHAPTER XVI. PINGUICULA. · CHAPTER XVII. UTRICULARIA. · CHAPTER XVIII. UTRICULARIA (continued). · INDEX.


 
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.