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The Second Epistle of St. Ignatius to the Ephesians

By: Ignatius Donnelly

Excerpt: Chapter 1. INASMUCH as your name. which is greatly beloved, is acceptable to me in God, [your name] which ye have acquired by nature, through a right and just will, and also by the faith and love of Jesus Christ our Saviour, and ye are imitators of God, and are fervent in the blood of God, and have speedily completed a work congenial to you, [for] when ye heard that I was bound,(3) so as to be able to do nothing for the sake of the common name and hope (and I hope, through your prayers, that I may be devoured by beasts at Rome, so that by means of this of which I have been accounted worthy, I may be endowed with strength to be a disciple of God), ye were diligent to come and see me. Seeing, then, that we have become acquainted with your multitude(4) in the name of God, by Onesimus, who is your bishop, in love which is unutterable, whom I pray that ye love in Jesus Christ our Lord, and that all of you imitate his example,(5) for blessed is He who has given you such a bishop, even as ye deserve [to have].(6)...

Table of Contents: THE SECOND EPISTLE OF ST. IGNATIUS TO THE EPHESIANS, 1 -- IGNATIUS, 1 -- THE SECOND EPISTLE OF IGNATIUS TO THE EPHESIANS(1), 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter III.(7), 1 -- Chapter VIII.(8), 2 -- Chapter IX, 2 -- Chapter X, 2 -- Chapter XIV.(1), 2 -- Chapter XV, 2 -- Chapter XVIII.(3), 2 -- Chapter XIX, 2...

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The Letter of the Churches of Vienna and Lugdunum to the Churches of Asia and Phrygia

By: Vienna and Lugdunum

Excerpt: IT began thus: ?The servants of Christ who sojourn in Vienna and Lugdunum of Gaul to the brethren throughout Asia and Phrygia, who have the same faith and hope of redemption as ourselves, peace, grace, and glory from God the Father, and from Christ Jesus our Lord.?...

Table of Contents: THE LETTER OF THE CHURCHES OF VIENNA AND LUGDUNUM TO THE CHURCHES OF ASIA AND VIENNA AND LUGDUNUM, 1

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The Land of Mist

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Excerpt: Chapter 1. In Which Our Special Commissioners Make A Start ? Chapter 1I. Which Describes an Evening in Strange Company ? Chapter 1II. In Which Professor Challenger Gives His Opinion ? Chapter 1V. Which Describes Some Strange Doings In Hammersmith....

Table of Contents: The Land Of Mist, 1 -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1

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Sons and Lovers

By: David Herbert Lawrence

Excerpt: ?The BOTTOMS? succeeded to ?Hell Row. Hell Row was a block of thatched, bulging cottages that stood by the brookside on Greenhill Lane. There lived the colliers who worked in the little gin?pits two fields away. The brook ran under the alder trees, scarcely soiled by these small mines, whose coal was drawn to the surface by donkeys that plodded wearily in a circle round a gin. And all over the countryside were these same pits, some of which had been worked in the time of Charles II, the few colliers and the donkeys burrowing down like ants into the earth, making queer mounds and little black places among the corn?fields and the meadows. And the cottages of these coal?miners, in blocks and pairs here and there, together with odd farms and homes of the stockingers, straying over the parish, formed the village of Bestwood....

Table of Contents: Sons and Lovers, 1 -- D. H. Lawrence, 1

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Ethics Part II : Of the Nature and Origin of the Mind

By: Benedict de Spinoza

Excerpt: DEFINITIONS. I. By body I mean a mode which expresses in a certain determinate manner the essence of God, in so far as he is considered as an extended thing. (See Pt. i., Prop. xxv. Coroll.) II. I consider as belonging to the essence of a thing that, which being given, the thing is necessarily given also, and, which being removed, the thing is necessarily removed also; in other words, that without which the thing, and which itself without the thing, can neither be nor be conceived. III. By idea, I mean the mental conception which is formed by the mind as a thinking thing. Explanation. I say conception rather than perception, because the word perception seems to imply that the mind is passive in respect to the object; whereas conception seems to express an activity of the mind....

Table of Contents: Ethics PART II: OF THE NATURE AND ORIGIN OF THE MIND, 1 -- Benedict de Spinoza, 1 -- Preface, 1 -- DEFINITIONS, 1 -- AXIOMS, 2 -- PROPOSITIONS, 2...

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Three Lives

By: Gertrude Stein

Excerpt: THE Good Anna: Part 1. The TRADESMEN of Bridgepoint learned to dread the sound of ?Miss Mathilda, for with that name the good Anna always conquered. The strictest of the one price stores found that they could give things for a little less, when the good Anna had fully said that ?Miss Mathilda? could not pay so much and that she could buy it cheaper ?by Lindheims.? Lindheims was Anna?s favorite store, for there they had bargain days, when flour and sugar were sold for a quarter of a cent less for a pound, and there the heads of the departments were all her friends and always managed to give her the bargain prices, even on other days....

Table of Contents: Three Lives, 1 -- Gertrude Stein, 1 -- The Good Anna: Part I, 1 -- Part II: The Life of the Good Anna, 7 -- Part III: The Death of the Good Anna, 32 -- Melanctha: Each One as She May, 35 -- The Gentle Lena:, 96...

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Tales of Daring and Danger

By: G. A. Henty

Excerpt: BEARS AND DACOITS. A TALE OF THE GHAUTS Chapter 1. A merry party were sitting in the verandah of one of the largest and handsomest bungalows of Poonah. It belonged to Colonel Hastings, colonel of a native regiment stationed there, and at present, in virtue of seniority, commanding a brigade. Tiffin was on, and three or four officers and four ladies had taken their seats in the comfortable cane lounging chairs which form the invariable furniture of the verandah of a well?ordered bungalow. Permission had been duly asked, and granted by Mrs. Hastings and the cheroots had just begun to draw, when Miss Hastings, a niece of the colonel, who had only arrived the previous week from England, said,? ?Uncle, I am quite disappointed. Mrs. Lyons showed me the bear she has got tied up in their compound, and it is the most wretched little thing, not bigger than Rover, papa?s retriever, and it?s full?grown. I thought bears were great fierce creatures, and this poor little thing seemed so restless and unhappy that I thought it quite a shame not to let it go.? Colonel Hastings smiled rather grimly....

Table of Contents: Tales of Daring and Danger, 1 -- G. A. Henty, 1 -- BEARS AND DACOITS. A TALE OF THE GHAUTS, 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 5 -- THE PATERNOSTERS. A YACHTING STORY, 10 -- A PIPE OF MYSTERY, 21 -- WHITE?FACED DICK. A STORY OF PINE?TREE GULCH, 30 -- A BRUSH WITH THE CHINESE. AND WHAT CAME OF IT, 35...

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The Man Who Was Thursday : A Nightmare

By: Chesterton, Gilbert Keith, 1874-1936

Excerpt: A WILD, MAD, HILARIOUS AND PROFOUNDLY MOVING TALE It is very difficult to classify The MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY. It is possible to say that it is a gripping adventure story of murderous criminals and brilliant policemen; but it was to be expected that the author of the Father Brown stories should tell a detective story like no?one else. On this level, therefore, The MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY succeeds superbly; if nothing else, it is a magnificent tour?de?force of suspense?writing....

Table of Contents: The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare, 1 -- G. K. Chesterton, 1

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The Chest of Chu Chan

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: JARED SHEBLEY leaned back in his teak?wood chair and toyed with the Burmese katar. His crisp smile, slicing across his parchment face, would have suited an Oriental potentate more than a New York curio collector. Shebley?s surroundings were in keeping with his appearance. This was his curio room, the pride of his Manhattan penthouse. Its walls were adorned with tall, narrow tapestries, woven mostly in gold and silver, set alternately between the glass?fronted cabinets that housed the rarities comprising Shebley?s collection. It would have required a sizable pamphlet to describe those items. In fact, such a pamphlet was already in the making; the proof sheets were scattered all over the chess table which Shebley used as a desk. The table itself, a bulky and elaborate affair inlaid with squares of black and white mother?of?pearl, was one of Shebley?s chief prizes. It was supposed to be the table on which a Persian prince had been maneuvering his men when he was captured, along with his royal tent, by Hulagu, the Mongolian invader operating under the banner of Genghis Khan....

Table of Contents: THE CHEST OF CHU CHAN, 1 -- Maxwell Grant, 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 5 -- Chapter III, 8 -- Chapter IV, 12 -- Chapter V, 16 -- Chapter VI, 19 -- Chapter VII, 22 -- Chapter VIII, 26 -- Chapter IX, 30 -- Chapter X, 33 -- Chapter XI, 37 -- Chapter XII, 41 -- Chapter XIII, 44 -- Chapter XIV, 47 -- Chapter XV, 50 -- Chapter XVI, 53 -- Chapter XVII, 55 -- Chapter XVIII, 59 -- Chapter XIX, 62 -- Chapter XX, 66...

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The Mother

By: Grazia Deledda

Preface: Novelists who have laid the scenes of their stories almost invariably in one certain country or district, or amongst one certain class of people, or who have dealt with one special topic or interest, are apt to be called monotonous by a public which merely reads to kill time or is always craving for new sensations in its literature. But to another and more serious class of reader this very fidelity to scene and steadfastness of outlook is one of the principal incentives to take up each fresh work of such writers, for it is safe to assume that they are writing about what they really know and understand and their work may be expected to deepen and develop with each succeeding book. Amongst such writers Grazia Deledda takes high rank. One of the foremost women novelists of Italy, if not the very first, she has been writing for some five and twenty years, and though almost always utilizing the same setting for her novels, each succeeding one has shown a different leading idea, a new variation upon the eternal theme of more or less primitive human nature....

Table of Contents: The Mother, 1 -- Grazia Deledda, 1 -- TRANSLATOR'S NOTE, 1 -- Preface, 2 -- Chapter I, 3 -- Chapter II, 9 -- Chapter III, 14 -- Chapter IV, 19 -- Chapter V, 23 -- Chapter VI, 29 -- Chapter VII, 34 -- Chapter VIII, 39 -- Chapter IX, 43 -- Chapter X, 47 -- Chapter XI, 52 -- Chapter XII, 57 -- Chapter XIII, 61 -- Chapter XIV, 64...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)

By: Mark Twain

Excerpt: Chapter 1. YOU don?t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly?Tom?s Aunt Polly, she is?and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before....

Table of Contents: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 1 -- Mark Twain, 1

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Metamorphosis, By Franz Kafka

By: David Wyllie.

Excerpt: One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin.

Table of Contents: Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, 1 -- Translated by David Wyllie, 1

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Keraban le Tetu, Vol. Ii

By: Jules Verne

Excerpt: I. DANS LEQUEL ON RETROUVE LE SEIGNEUR KERABAN, FURIEUX D'AVOIR VOYAGE EN CHEMIN DE FER. On s'en souvient sans doute, Van Mitten, desole de n'avoir pu visiter les ruines de l'ancienne Colchide, avait manifeste l'intention de se dedommager en explorant le mythologique Phase, qui, sous le nom moins euphonique de Rion, se jette maintenant a Poti dont il forme le petit port sur le littoral de la mer Noire. En verite le digne Hollandais dut regulierement rabattre encore de ses esperances! Il s'agissait bien vraiment de s'elancer sur les traces de Jason et des Argonautes, de parcourir les lieux celebres ou cet audacieux fils d'Eson alla conquerir la Toison d'Or! Non! ce qu'il convenait de faire au plus vite, c'etait de quitter Poli, de se lancer sur les traces du seigneur Keraban, et de le rejoindre a la frontiere turco?russe. De la, nouvelle deception pour Van Mitten. Il etait deja cinq heures du soir. On comptait repartir le lendemain matin, 13 septembre. De Poti, Van Mitten ne put donc voir que le jardin public, ou s'elevent les ruines d'une ancienne forteresse, les maisons baties sur pilotis, dans lesquelles s'abrite une popu...

Table of Contents: Keraban Le Tetu, Vol. II, 1 -- Jules Verne, 1 -- DEUXIEME PARTIE, 1 -- I. DANS LEQUEL ON RETROUVE LE SEIGNEUR KERABAN, FURIEUX D'AVOIR -- VOYAGE EN CHEMIN DE FER, 2 -- II. DANS LEQUEL VAN MITTEN SE DECIDE A CEDER AUX OBSESSIONS DE BRUNO, -- ET CE QUI S'ENSUIT, 9 -- III. DANS LEQUEL BRUNO JOUE A SON CAMARADE NIZIB UN TOUR QUE LE -- LECTEUR VOUDRA BIEN LUI PARDONNER, 20 -- IV. DANS LEQUEL TOUT SE PASSE AU MILIEU DES ECLATS DE LA FOUDRE ET DE -- LA FULGURATION DES ECLAIRS, 27 -- V. DE QUOI L'ON CAUSE ET CE QUE L'ON VOIT SUR LA ROUTE D'ATINA A -- TREBIZONDE, 34 -- VI. OU IL EST QUESTIONS DE NOUVEAUX PERSONNAGES QUE LE SEIGNEUR -- KERABAN VA RENCONTRER AU CARAVANSERAIL DE RISSAR, 41 -- VII. DANS LEQUEL LE JUGE DE TREBIZOND PROCEDE A SON ENQUETE D'UNE -- FACON ASSEZ INGENIEUSE, 48 -- VIII. QUI FINIT D'UNE MANIERE TRES INATTENDUE, SURTOUT POUR L'AMI VAN -- MITTEN, 55 -- IX. DANS LEQUEL VAN MITTEN, EN SE FIANCANT A LA NOBLE SARABOUL, A -- L'HONNEUR DE DEVENIR BEAU?FRERE DU SEIGNEUR YANAR, 63 -- X. PENDANT LEQUEL LES HEROS DE CETTE HISTOIRE NE PERDENT NI UN JOUR NI -- UNE HEURE, 69 -- XI. DANS LEQUEL LE SEIGNEUR KERABAN SE...

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A Little Princess

By: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Excerpt: Once on a dark winter?s day, when the yellow fog hung so thick and heavy in the streets of London that the lamps were lighted and the shop windows blazed with gas as they do at night, an odd?looking little girl sat in a cab with her father and was driven rather slowly through the big thoroughfares. She sat with her feet tucked under her, and leaned against her father, who held her in his arm, as she stared out of the window at the passing people with a queer old?fashioned thoughtfulness in her big eyes. She was such a little girl that one did not expect to see such a look on her small face. It would have been an old look for a child of twelve, and Sara Crewe was only seven. The fact was, however, that she was always dreaming and thinking odd things and could not herself remember any time when she had not been thinking things about grown?up people and the world they belonged to. She felt as if she had lived a long, long time....

Table of Contents: A Little Princess, 1 -- Frances Hodgson Burnett, 1 -- A Little Princess -- i

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Hardboiled

By: Harold de Polo

Excerpt: Pete the Muscle, leaning forward on his somewhat ornate desk, was gazing in fond and almost ethereal fascination at the robin sitting on the nest between the shutter and window coping. His lips, bulbously predatory in repose, had the curve of a faint smile on them that actually made their expression tender. Gosh, but nature was wonderful! A discreet knock that was somehow tempered with homage, sounding on the door, caused Pete the Muscle?s heavy face to cloud....

Table of Contents: HARDBOILED, 1 -- HAROLD de POLO, 1

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Poil de Carotte

By: Jules Renard

Excerpt: Les Poules Je parie, dit madame Lepic, qu'Honorine a encore oublie de fermer les poules. C'est vrai. On peut s'en assurer par la fenetre. La?bas, tout au fond de la grande cour, le petit toit aux poules decoupe, dans la nuit, le carr noir de sa porte ouverte. Felix, si tu allais les fermer? dit madame Lepic a l'aine de ses trois enfants. Je ne suis pas ici pour m'occuper des poules, dit Felix, garcon pale, indolent et poltron. Et toi, Ernestine? Oh! Moi, maman, j'aurais trop peur! Grand frere Felix et soeur Ernestine levent a peine la tete pour repondre. Ils lisent, tres interesses, les coudes sur la table, presque front contre front. Dieu, que je suis bete! Dit madame Lepic. Je n'y pensais plus. Poil de Carotte, va fermer les poules! Elle donne ce petit nom d'amour a son dernier ne, parce qu'il a les cheveux roux et la peau tachee. Poil de Carotte, qui joue a rien sous la table, se dresse et dit avec timidite....

Table of Contents: Poil de Carotte, 1 -- Jules Renard, 1 -- Les Poules, 2 -- Les Perdrix, 3 -- C'est le Chien, 4 -- Le Cauchemar, 5 -- Sauf votre Respect, 6 -- Le Pot, 7 -- Les Lapins, 9 -- La Pioche, 10 -- La Carabine, 10 -- La Taupe, 13 -- La Luzerne, 14 -- La Timbale, 16 -- La Mie de Pain, 17 -- Le Trompette, 18 -- La MŠche, 19 -- Le Bain, 20 -- Honrine, 22 -- La Marmite, 25 -- R‚ticence, 27 -- Agathe, 27 -- Le Programme, 29 -- L'Aveugle, 30 -- Le Jour de l'An, 31 -- Aller et Retour, 33 -- Le Porte?Plume, 34 -- Les Joues rouges, 36 -- Les Poux, 40 -- Comme Brutus, 43 -- Lettres choisies, 45 -- Le Toiton, 47 -- Le Chat, 48 -- Les Moutons, 50 -- Parrain, 52 -- La Fontaine, 53 -- Les Prunes, 55 -- Mathilde, 56 -- Le Coffre?Fort, 58 -- Les Tˆtards, 61 -- Coup de Th‚ƒtre, 62 -- ScŠne II, 63 -- ScŠne III, 63 -- ScŠne IV, 63 -- ScŠne V, 63 -- En Chasse, 64 -- La Mouche, 65 -- Poil de Carotte -- i...

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El Paraiso de las Mujeres

By: Vicente Blasco Ibáñez

Excerpt: AL LECTOR. Considero necesario dar una explicacion sobre el origen de este libro. Una casa editorial cinematografica de los Estados Unidos me pidio hace un ano una novela para convertirla en film, recomendandome que fuese muy ?interesante? y se despegase por completo de los convencionalismos y rutinas que hasta ahora vienen observandose en las historias presentadas por medio del cinematografo. Yo admiro el arte cinematografico?llamado con razon el ?septimo arte??, por ser un producto legitimo y noble de nuestra epoca. Como todo progreso, ha encontrado numerosos enemigos, que fingen despreciarlo; especialmente entre los escritores faltos de las condiciones necesarias para servir a este arte, aunque lo deseasen. La llamada Republica de las Letras es un estado conservador y misogeno, que se subleva instintivamente ante toda novedad y la repele con sarcasmos que cree aristocraticos....

Table of Contents: El paraiso de las mujeres, 1 -- Vicente Blasco Ibanez, 1 -- AL LECTOR, 1 -- I. Frente a la Tierra de Van Diemen, 7 -- II. Noche de misterios y despertar asombroso, 13 -- III. De como Edwin Gillespie fue llevado a la capital de la Republica, 18 -- IV. Las riquezas del Hombre?Montana, 28 -- V. La leccion de Historia del profesor Flimnap, 38 -- VI. Donde el profesor Flimnap termina su leccion, 48 -- VII. El mas grande de los asombros de Gillespie, 56 -- VIII. En el que el Padre de los Maestros visita al Hombre?Montana, 67 -- IX. Donde el gigante va de caza y Popito expone sus ideas sobre el gobierno de las mujeres, 78 -- X. En el que se ve como el Hombre Montana conocio al fin la Ciudad?Paraiso de las Mujeres, y -- la deplorable aventura con que termino esta visita, 85 -- XI. Que trata del discurso pronunciado por el senador Gurdilo y de como el Hombre?Montana -- cambio de traje, 95 -- XII. De como Edwin Gillespie perdio su bienestar y le falto muy poco para perder la vida, 109 -- XIII. Donde se ve como unos pigmeos bigotudos intentaron asesinar al gigante, 117 -- XIV. Lo que hizo el Gentleman?Montana para que Popito...

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The Ethics

By: Benedict de Spinoza

Excerpt: I. BY THAT which is SELF?CAUSED, I mean that of which the essence involves existence, or that of which the nature is only conceivable as existent. II. A thing is called FINITE AFTER ITS KIND, when it can be limited by another thing of the same nature; for instance, a body is called finite because we always conceive another greater body. So, also, a thought is limited by another thought, but a body is not limited by thought, nor a thought by body. III. BY SUBSTANCE, I mean that which is in itself, and is conceived through itself; in other words, that of which a conception can be formed independently of any other conception....

Table of Contents: The Ethics, 1 -- Benedict de Spinoza, 1 -- PART I: CONCERNING GOD, 1 -- DEFINITIONS, 1 -- Axioms, 2 -- PROPOSITIONS, 2 -- APPENDIX, 17...

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La Dame de Monsoreau V. 2

By: Pere Alexandre Dumas

Excerpt: CHAPITRE PREMIER. COMMENT FRERE GORENFLOT SE REVEILLA, ET DE L'ACCUEIL QUI LUI FUT FAIT A SON COUVENT. Nous avons laisse notre ami Chicot en extase devant le sommeil non interrompu et devant le ronflement splendide de frere Gorenflot; il fit signe a l'aubergiste de se retirer et d'emporter la lumiere, apres lui avoir recommande sur toutes choses de ne pas dire un mot au digne frere de la sortie qu'il avait faite a dix heures du soir, et de la rentree qu'il venait de faire a trois heures du matin....

Table of Contents: La dame de Monsoreau v.2, 1 -- Alexandre Dumas, 1 -- CHAPITRE PREMIER. COMMENT FRERE GORENFLOT SE REVEILLA, ET DE -- L'ACCUEIL QUI LUI FUT FAIT A SON COUVENT, 2 -- CHAPITRE II. COMMENT FRERE GORENFLOT DEMEURA CONVAINCU QU'IL ETAIT -- SOMNAMBULE, ET DEPLORA AMEREMENT CETTE INFIRMITE, 9 -- CHAPITRE III. COMMENT FRERE GORENFLOT VOYAGEA SUR UN ANE NOMME -- PANURGE, ET APPRIT DANS SON VOYAGE BEAUCOUP DE CHOSES QU'IL NE -- SAVAIT PAS, 17 -- CHAPITRE IV. COMMENT FRERE GORENFLOT TROQUA SON ANE CONTRE UNE -- MULE, ET SA MULE CONTRE UN CHEVAL, 22 -- CHAPITRE V. COMMENT CHICOT ET SON COMPAGNON S'INSTALLERENT A -- L'HOTELLERIE DU CYGNE DE LA CROIX, ET COMMENT ILS Y FURENT RECUS PAR -- L'HOTE, 30 -- CHAPITRE VI. COMMENT LE MOINE CONFESSA L'AVOCAT, ET COMMENT -- L'AVOCAT CONFESSA LE MOINE, 37 -- CHAPITRE VII. COMMENT CHICOT, APRES AVOIR FAIT UN TROU AVEC UNE -- VRILLE, EN FIT UN AVEC SON EPEE, 48 -- CHAPITRE VIII. COMMENT LE DUC D'ANJOU APPRIT QUE DIANE DE MERIDOR -- N'ETAIT POINT MORTE, 55 -- CHAPITRE IX. COMMENT CHICOT REVINT AU LOUVRE ET FUT RECU PAR LE ROI -- HENRI III, 63 -- CHAPITRE X. CE QUI S'ETAIT PASSE ENTRE MONSEIGNE...

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The Idiot

By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Excerpt: I. Towards the end of November, during a thaw, at nine o?clock one morning, a train on the Warsaw and Petersburg railway was approaching the latter city at full speed. The morning was so damp and misty that it was only with great difficulty that the day succeeded in breaking; and it was impossible to distinguish anything more than a few yards away from the carriage windows. Some of the passengers by this particular train were returning from abroad; but the third?class carriages were the best filled, chiefly with insignificant persons of various occupations and degrees, picked up at the different stations nearer town. All of them seemed weary, and most of them had sleepy eyes and a shivering expression, while their complexions generally appeared to have taken on the colour of the fog outside....

Table of Contents: The Idiot, 1 -- Fyodor Dostoyevsky, 1 -- The Idiot -- i

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