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A Hunter's Sketches

By: Ivan Turgenev

Excerpt: KHOR AND KALINICH. ANYONE who has chanced to pass from Bolkhov District into Zhizdra District must have been impressed by the striking difference between the race of people in the province of Orel and the population of the province of Kaluga. The peasant of Orel is not tall, is bent in figure, sullen and suspicious in his looks; he lives in wretched little hovels of aspen?wood, labours as a serf in the fields, and engages in no kind of trading, is miserably fed, and wears bast shoes. The rent?paying peasant of Kaluga lives in roomy huts of pine?wood; he is tall, bold, and cheerful in his looks, neat and clean of countenance; he carries on a trade in butter and tar, and on holidays he wears high?boots. The village of the Orel province (we are speaking now of the eastern part of the province) is usually situated in the midst of ploughed fields, near a ravine which has been converted into a filthy pool. Except for a few of the ever?accommodating willows and two or three gaunt birch?trees, you do not see a tree for a mile round; hut is huddled up against hut, their roofs crudely thatched with rotting straw ... The villages of K...

Table of Contents: A Hunter's Sketches, 1 -- Ivan Turgenev, 1

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The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Excerpt: I was not surprised. Indeed, my only wonder was that he had not already been mixed upon this extraordinary case, which was the one topic of conversation through the length and breadth of England. For a whole day my companion had rambled about the room with his chin upon his chest and his brows knitted, charging and recharging his pipe with the strongest black tobacco, and absolutely deaf to any of my questions or remarks. Fresh editions of every paper had been sent up by our news agent, only to be glanced over and tossed down into a corner. Yet, silent as he was, I knew perfectly well what it was over which he was brooding. There was but one problem before the public which could challenge his powers of analysis, and that was the singular disappearance of the favorite for the Wessex Cup, and the tragic murder of its trainer. When, therefore, he suddenly announced his intention of setting out for the scene of the drama it was only what I had both expected and hoped for....

Table of Contents: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, 1 -- Arthur Conan Doyle, 1 -- The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes -- i

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Problem of the Crystal Gazer

By: Jacques Futrelle

Excerpt: With hideous, goggling eyes the great god Budd sat cross?legged on a pedestal and stared stolidly into the semi?darkness. He saw, by the wavering light of a peacock lamp which swooped down from the ceiling with wings outstretched, what might have been a nook in a palace of East India. Draperies hung here, there, everywhere; richly embroidered divans sprawled about; fierce tiger rugs glared up from the floor; grotesque idols grinned mirthlessly in unexpected corners; strange arms were grouped on the walls. Outside the trolley cars clanged blatantly....

Table of Contents: Problem of the Crystal Gazer, 1 -- Jacques Futrelle, 1

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Ecce Homo

By: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Excerpt: Vorwort 1. In Voraussicht, dass ich ueber Kurzem mit der schwersten Forderung an die Menschheit herantreten muss, die je an sie gestellt wurde, scheint es mir unerlaesslich, zu sagen, wer ich bin. Im Grunde duerfte man?s wissen: denn ich habe mich nicht ?unbezeugt gelassen?. Das Missverhaeltniss aber zwischen der Groesse meiner Aufgabe und der Kleinheit meiner Zeitgenossen ist darin zum Ausdruck gekommen, dass man mich weder gehoert, noch auch nur gesehn hat. Ich lebe auf meinen eignen Credit hin, es ist vielleicht bloss ein Vorurtheil, dass ich lebe? Ich brauche nur irgend einen ?Gebildeten? zu sprechen, der im Sommer ins Oberengadin kommt, um mich zu ueberzeugen, dass ich nicht lebe... Unter diesen Umstaenden giebt es eine Pflicht, gegen die im Grunde meine Gewohnheit, noch mehr der Stolz meiner Instinkte revoltirt, naemlich zu sagen: Hoert mich! denn ich bin der und der. Verwechselt mich vor Allem nicht!...

Table of Contents: Ecce Homo, 1 -- Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, 1 -- Vorwort, 1 -- Inhalt, 3 -- Warum ich so weise bin, 4 -- Warum ich so klug bin, 10 -- Warum ich so gute Buecher schreibe, 18 -- Die Geburt der Tragoedie, 22 -- Die Unzeitgemaessen, 25 -- Menschliches, Allzumenschliches, 27 -- Morgenroethe, 29 -- Die froehliche Wissenschaft, 31 -- Also sprach Zarathustra, 31 -- Jenseits von Gut und Boese, 38 -- Genealogie der Moral, 39 -- Goetzen?Daemmerung, 39 -- Der Fall Wagner, 40 -- Warum ich ein Schicksal bin, 43...

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Het Portret Van Dorian Gray

By: Oscar Wilde

Excerpt: Het atelier was vol rijken geur van rozen, en zoodra de lichte zomerwind in de boomen van den tuin trilde, kwam er door de opene deur een zware adem van seringen, eene fijnere aroom van den roze?bloeienden meidoorn binnen....

Table of Contents: Het portret van Dorian Gray, 1 -- Oscar Wilde, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 9 -- III, 19 -- IV, 22 -- V, 31 -- VI, 39 -- VII, 44 -- VIII, 50 -- IX, 58 -- X, 64 -- XI, 69 -- XII, 74 -- XIII, 78 -- XIV, 82 -- XV, 91 -- XVI, 96 -- XVII, 101 -- XVIII, 108 -- XIX, 113 -- Het portret van Dorian Gray...

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A Plea for Old Cap Collier

By: Irvin S. Cobb

Excerpt: FOR a good many years now I have been carrying this idea round with me. It was more or less of a loose and unformed idea, and it wouldn't jell. What brought it round to the solidification point was this: Here the other week, being half sick, I was laid up over Sunday in a small hotel in a small seacoast town. I had read all the newspapers and all the magazines I could get hold of. The local bookstore, of course, was closed. They won?t let the oysters stay open on Sunday in that town. The only literature my fellow guests seemed interested in was mailorder tabs and price currents....

Table of Contents: A Plea For Old Cap Collier, 1 -- Irvin S. Cobb, 1

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Gulliver of Mars

By: Edwin Lester Linden Arnold

Excerpt: Chapter One. Dare I say it? Dare I say that I, a plain, prosaic lieutenant in the republican service have done the incredible things here set out for the love of a woman for a chimera in female shape; for a pale, vapid ghost of woman?loveliness? At times I tell myself I dare not: that you will laugh, and cast me aside as a fabricator; and then again I pick up my pen and collect the scattered pages, for I MUST write it the pallid splendour of that thing I loved, and won, and lost is ever before me, and will not be forgotten. The tumult of the struggle into which that vision led me still throbs in my mind, the soft, lisping voices of the planet I ransacked for its sake and the roar of the destruction which followed me back from the quest drowns all other sounds in my ears! I must and will write it relieves me; read and believe as you list....

Table of Contents: Gulliver of Mars, 1 -- Edwin L. Arnold, 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 4 -- Chapter III, 9 -- Chapter IV, 16 -- Chapter V, 22 -- Chapter VI, 28 -- Chapter VII, 32 -- Chapter VIII, 38 -- Chapter IX, 41 -- Chapter X, 45 -- Chapter XI, 49 -- Chapter XII, 53 -- Chapter XIII, 58 -- Chapter XIV, 63 -- Chapter XV, 68 -- Chapter XVI, 73 -- Chapter XVII, 78 -- Chapter XVIII, 83 -- Chapter XIX, 87 -- Chapter XX, 90 -- Gulliver of Mars...

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The Man Who Shook the Earth

By: Tom Stephens

Excerpt: THE man looked as tough as sin. But he was crying. He whimpered. He bubbled at the mouth like a child half crazed with horror and fear. He perspired, although the night was cold....

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The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

By: Laurence Sterne

Excerpt: I wish either my father or my mother, or indeed both of them, as they were in duty both equally bound to it, had minded what they were about when they begot me; had they duly consider?d how much depended upon what they were then doing; that not only the production of a rational Being was concerned in it, but that possibly the happy formation and temperature of his body, perhaps his genius and the very cast of his mind; and, for aught they knew to the contrary, even the fortunes of his whole house might take their turn from the humours and dispositions which were then uppermost; Had they duly weighed and considered all this, and proceeded accordingly, I am verily persuaded I should have made a quite different figure in the world, from that in which the reader is likely to see me....

Table of Contents: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, 1 -- Laurence Sterne, 1

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The Divine Comedy

By: Alighieri, Dante, 1265-1321

Excerpt: CANTO I. IN the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct: and e'en to tell It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death. Yet to discourse of what there good befell, All else will I relate discover?d there. How first I enter?d it I scarce can say, Such sleepy dullness in that instant weigh?d My senses down, when the true path I left, But when a mountain?s foot I reach?d, where clos?d The valley, that had pierc?d my heart with dread, I look?d aloft, and saw his shoulders broad Already vested with that planet?s beam, Who leads all wanderers safe through every way....

Table of Contents: The Divine Comedy, 1 -- Dante, 1 -- Canto I, 3 -- Canto II, 6 -- Canto III, 9 -- Canto IV, 11 -- Canto V, 15 -- Canto VI, 17 -- Canto VII, 20 -- Canto VIII, 23 -- Canto IX, 25 -- Canto X, 28 -- Canto XI, 31 -- Canto XII, 33 -- Canto XIII, 36 -- Canto XIV, 39 -- Canto XV, 42 -- Canto XVI, 45 -- Canto XVII, 48 -- Canto XVIII, 51 -- Canto XIX, 53 -- Canto XX, 56 -- Canto XXI, 59 -- Canto XXII, 62 -- Canto XXIII, 65 -- Canto XXIV, 68 -- Canto XXV, 71 -- Canto XXVI, 74 -- Canto XXVII, 77 -- Canto XXVIII, 79 -- Canto XXIX, 82 -- Canto XXX, 85 -- Canto XXXI, 88 -- Canto XXXII, 91 -- Canto XXXIII, 94 -- Canto XXXIV, 97 -- NOTES TO HELL, 100 -- PURGATORY, 143 -- Canto I, 143 -- Canto II, 146 -- Canto III, 148 -- Canto IV, 151 -- Canto V, 154 -- Canto VI, 157 -- Canto VII, 160 -- Canto VIII, 163 -- Canto IX, 166 -- The Divine Comedy -- i...

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Ulysses

By: James Joyce

Excerpt: [1] Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed. A yellow dressinggown, ungirdled, was sustained gently behind him on the mild morning air. He held the bowl aloft and intoned: Introibo ad altare Dei. Halted, he peered down the dark winding stairs and called out coarsely: Come up, Kinch! Come up, you fearful jesuit! Solemnly he came forward and mounted the round gunrest. He faced about and blessed gravely thrice the tower, the surrounding land and the awaking mountains. Then, catching sight of Stephen Dedalus, he bent towards him and made rapid crosses in the air, gurgling in his throat and shaking his head. Stephen Dedalus, displeased and sleepy, leaned his arms on the top of the staircase and looked coldly at the shaking gurgling face that blessed him, equine in its length, and at the light untonsured hair, grained and hued like pale oak....

Table of Contents: Ulysses, 1 -- James Joyce, 1 -- Yes, 537

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The Valley of Fear

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Excerpt: I believe that I am one of the most long?suffering of mortals; but I?ll admit that I was annoyed at the sardonic interruption. ?Really, Holmes,? said I severely, ?you are a little trying at times.? He was too much absorbed with his own thoughts to give any immediate answer to my remonstrance. He leaned upon his hand, with his untasted breakfast before him, and he stared at the slip of paper which he had just drawn from its envelope. Then he took the envelope itself, held it up to the light, and very carefully studied both the exterior and the flap. ?It is Porlock?s writing,? said he thoughtfully. ?I can hardly doubt that it is Porlock?s writing, though I have seen it only twice before. The Greek e with the peculiar top flourish is distinctive. But if it is Porlock, then it must be something of the very first importance.?...

Table of Contents: The Valley of Fear, 1 -- Arthur Conan Doyle, 1

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Why Worry

By: George Lincoln Walton

Preface: No apology is needed for adding another to the treatises on a subject whose importance is evidenced by the number already offered the public.

Table of Contents: Why Worry?, 1 -- George Lincoln Walton, M.D, 1 -- Preface, 2 -- DEFINITIONS, 2 -- I. INTRODUCTORY, 3 -- II. EPICURUS AS A MENTAL HEALER, 4 -- III. MARCUS AURELIUS, 6 -- IV. ANALYSIS OF WORRY, 8 -- V. WORRY AND OBSESSION, 10 -- VI. THE DOUBTING FOLLY, 16 -- VII. HYPOCHONDRIA, 20 -- VIII. NEURASTHENIA, 25 -- IX. SLEEPLESSNESS, 29 -- X. OCCUPATION NEUROSIS, 33 -- XI. THE WORRIER AT HOME, 34 -- XII. THE WORRIER ON HIS TRAVELS, 36 -- XIII. THE WORRIER AT THE TABLE, 38 -- XIV. THE FEAR OF BECOMING INSANE, 39 -- XV. RECAPITULATORY, 42 -- XVI. MAXIMS MISAPPLIED, 43 -- XVII. THE FAD, 44 -- XVIII. HOME TREATMENT, 48 -- XIX. HOME TREATMENT (CONTINUED), 51...

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Java Head

By: Joseph Hergesheimer

Excerpt: VERY LATE indeed in May, but early in the morning, Laurel Ammidon lay in bed considering two widely different aspects of chairs. The day before she had been eleven, and the comparative maturity of that age had filled her with a moving disdain for certain fanciful thoughts which had given her extreme youth a decidedly novel if not an actually adventurous setting. Until yesterday, almost, she had regarded the various chairs of the house as beings endowed with life and character; she had held conversations with some, and, with a careless exterior not warranted by an inner dread, avoided others in gloomy dusks. All this, now, she contemptuously discarded. Chairs were ? chairs, things to sit on, wood and stuffed cushions. Yet she was slightly melancholy at losing such a satisfactory lot of reliable familiars: unlike older people, victims of the most disconcerting moods and mysterious changes, chairs could always be counted on to remain secure in their individual peculiarities....

Table of Contents: Java Head, 1

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A Simple Story

By: Inchbald

Excerpt: It is said, a book should be read with the same spirit with which it has been written. In that case, fatal must be the reception of this for the writer frankly avows, that during the time she has been writing it, she has suffered every quality and degree of weariness and lassitude, into which no other employment could have betrayed her....

Table of Contents: A Simple Story, 1 -- Mrs. Inchbald, 1 -- Preface, 2 -- VOL. I, 3 -- Chapter I, 3 -- Chapter II, 4 -- Chapter III, 8 -- Chapter IV, 8 -- Chapter V, 10 -- Chapter VI, 13 -- Chapter VII, 15 -- Chapter VIII, 18 -- Chapter IX, 20 -- Chapter X, 22 -- Chapter XI, 24 -- Chapter XII, 27 -- Chapter XIII, 31 -- Chapter XIV, 33 -- Chapter XV, 37 -- Chapter XVI, 40 -- Chapter XVII, 45 -- VOL. II, 48 -- Chapter I, 48 -- Chapter II, 51 -- Chapter III, 53 -- Chapter IV, 59 -- Chapter V, 65 -- Chapter VI, 69 -- Chapter VII, 71 -- Chapter VIII, 77 -- Chapter IX, 82 -- Chapter X, 88 -- Chapter XI, 91 -- Chapter XII, 98 -- VOL. III, 102 -- Chapter I, 102 -- Chapter II, 105 -- Chapter III, 106 -- Chapter IV, 110 -- Chapter V, 111 -- Chapter VI, 115 -- Chapter VII, 119 -- Chapter VIII, 121 -- Chapter IX, 124 -- Chapter X, 126 -- Chapter XI, 128 -- Chapter XII, 133...

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The World Turned Upside Down

Excerpt: Here you may see what?s very rare, The world turn?d upside down; A tree and castle in the air, A man walk on his crown. The WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN, OR, No News, and Strange News....

Table of Contents: The World Turned Upside Down, 1 -- Anonymous, 1

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Diddling. Considered as One of the Exact Sciences

By: Edgar Allen Poe

Excerpt: Hey, diddle diddle The cat and the fiddle SINCE the world began there have been two Jeremys. The one wrote a Jeremiad about usury, and was called Jeremy Bentham. He has been much admired by Mr. John Neal, and was a great man in a small way....

Table of Contents: Diddling. Considered As One Of The ExAct Sciences, 1 -- Edgar Poe, 1

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Love for Love

By: William Congreve

Excerpt: My Lord, A young poet is liable to the same vanity and indiscretion with a young lover; and the great man who smiles upon one, and the fine woman who looks kindly upon t'other, are both of ?em in danger of having the favour published with the first opportunity. But there may be a different motive, which will a little distinguish the offenders. For though one should have a vanity in ruining another?s reputation, yet the other may only have an ambition to advance his own. And I beg leave, my lord, that I may plead the latter, both as the cause and excuse of this dedication....

Table of Contents: Love for Love, 1 -- William Congreve, 1 -- Act I. -- Scene I, 4 -- Act II. -- Scene I, 22 -- Act III. -- Scene I, 39 -- Act IV. -- Scene I, 60 -- Act V. -- Scene I, 81 -- Love for Love -- i...

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Felix Holt, The Radical

By: George Eliot

Introduction: FIVE?AND?THIRTY years ago the glory had not yet departed from the old coach?roads; the great roadside inns were still brilliant with well?polished tankards, the smiling glances of pretty barmaids, and the repartees of jocose ostlers; the mail still announced itself by the merry notes of the horn; the hedge?cutter or the rick?thatcher might still know the exact hour by the unfailing yet otherwise meteoric apparition of the peagreen Tally?ho or the yellow Independent; and elderly gentlemen in pony?chaises, quartering nervously to make way for the rolling swinging swiftness, had not ceased to remark that times were finely changed since they used to see the pack?horses and hear the tinkling of their bells on their very highway....

Table of Contents: Felix Holt, The Radical, 1 -- George Eliot, 1 -- Introduction, 2 -- Chapter 1, 6 -- Chapter 2, 17 -- Chapter 3, 24 -- Chapter 4, 27 -- Chapter 5, 31 -- Chapter 6, 41 -- Chapter 7, 49 -- Chapter 8, 58 -- Chapter 9, 62 -- Chapter 10, 66 -- Chapter 11, 70 -- Chapter 12, 79 -- Chapter 13, 81 -- Chapter 14, 86 -- Chapter 15, 91 -- Chapter 16, 95 -- Chapter 17, 101 -- Chapter 18, 106 -- Chapter 19, 108 -- Chapter 20, 111 -- Chapter 21, 117 -- Chapter 22, 121 -- Chapter 23, 126 -- Chapter 24, 130 -- Chapter 25, 135 -- Chapter 26, 138 -- Chapter 27, 141 -- Chapter 28, 147 -- Chapter 29, 154 -- Chapter 30, 157 -- Chapter 31, 164 -- Chapter 32, 168 -- Chapter 33, 171 -- Chapter 34, 177 -- Chapter 35, 179 -- Chapter 36, 183 -- Chapter 37, 190 -- Chapter 38, 196 -- Chapter 39, 202 -- Chapter 40, 205 -- Chapter 41, 211 -- Chapter 42, 214 -- Chapter 43, 220 -- Chapter 44, 233 -- Chapter 45, 235...

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Coriolanus, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens, Titus Andronicus

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Coriolanus. Act 1, Scene 1. Rome. A street. Enter a company of mutinous Citizens, with staves, clubs, and other weapons First Citizen Before we proceed any further, hear me speak. All Speak, speak. First Citizen You are all resolved rather to die than to famish? All Resolved. resolved. First Citizen First, you know Caius Marcius is chief enemy to the people. All We know't, we know't. First Citizen Let us kill him, and we'll have corn at our own price. Is't a verdict? All No more talking on't; let it be done: away, away! Second Citizen One word, good citizens. First Citizen We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good. What authority surfeits on would relieve us....

Table of Contents: >Coriolanus, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens, Titus Andronicus, 1 -- William Shakespeare, 1 -- Coriolanus, 2 -- Act 1, Scene 1, 2 -- Act 1, Scene 2, 14 -- Act 1, Scene 3, 16 -- Act 1, Scene 4, 21 -- Act 1, Scene 5, 25 -- Act 1, Scene 6, 27 -- Act 1, Scene 7, 31 -- Act 1, Scene 8, 32 -- Act 1, Scene 9, 33 -- Act 1, Scene 10, 37 -- Act 2, Scene 1, 38 -- Act 2, Scene 3, 56 -- Act 3, Scene 1, 68 -- Act 3, Scene 2, 88 -- Act 3, Scene 3, 94 -- Act 4, Scene 1, 102 -- Act 4, Scene 2, 105 -- Act 4, Scene 3, 109 -- Act 4, Scene 4, 111 -- Act 4, Scene 5, 112 -- Act 4, Scene 6, 124 -- Act 4, Scene 7, 133 -- Act 5, Scene 1, 135 -- Act 5, Scene 2, 139 -- Act 5, Scene 3, 144 -- Act 5, Scene 4, 151 -- Act 5, Scene 5, 154 -- Act 5, Scene 6, 155 -- Julius Caesar, 163 -- Act 1, Scene 1, 163 -- Act 1, Scene 2, 166 -- Act 1, Scene 3, 178 -- Act 2, Scene 1, 185 -- Act 2, Scene 2, 199 -- Act 2, Scene 3, 204 -- Act 2, Scene 4, 205 -- Act 3, Scene 1, 208 -- Act 3, Scene 2, 221 -- Act 3, Scene 3, 233 -- Act 4, Scene 1, 235 -- Act 4, Scene 2, 237 -- Act 4, Scene 3, 240 -- Act 5, Scene 1, 258...

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